American Public Schools are Leaving Black Students Behind

The Current System is Broken, Providing Little Hope for Parents

We Have a Solution

We Can Create a Better Future for Your Children and America

previous arrowprevious arrow
next arrownext arrow
Slider

So how can we
fix education?

SCHOOL CHOICE – Every child has a passion. If your school cannot or will not nurture your child’s unique qualities then the system must provide alternative choices so you can change schools.

HIGHER EXPECTATIONS – Schools are lowering the standards for black students; we need new rules and guidelines to reverse this trend. Our children must be encouraged to excel and over-achieve in school, parents should demand elevated standards, not lower.

BLACK GRADES MATTER – “Social Justice” indoctrination has surpassed learning as a priority in the classroom. School is a place for curriculum-based education, not political and social training.

Here are few facts that may help you understand
the problem of education in America.

While the gap in high school completion is closing, black and Hispanic
students are still less likely than their white counterparts to have a
high school diploma
, according to a paper on multidimensional poverty
and race by Richard Reeves, Edward Rodrigue, and Elizabeth Kneeb
Black and Latino students have only somewhat lower rates of
post-secondary school enrollment than whites and Asians,
but have much lower levels of educational attainment by their
mid-20s, according to the Metropolitan Policy Program’s Martha Ross.
While students across these groups enroll at similar rates, they earn
Bachelor’s degrees at significantly different rates

While there has been an increase in black college-going, most of this rise has
been in lower-quality institutions, at least in terms of alumni earnings, illustrates
Jonathan Rothwell
, Black students make up just four percent of
undergraduate enrollees in the top decile of the nation’s four-year colleges,
ranked by mid-career alumni earning figures. By contrast, 26 percent of students
in the bottom rank of colleges are black:

Black and Hispanic Students less likely to have a diploma

While the gap in high school completion is closing, black and Hispanic students are still less likely than their white counterparts to have a high school diploma, according to a paper on multidimensional poverty and race by Richard Reeves, Edward Rodrigue, and Elizabeth Kneebone.

Black and Latino Students less likely to finish college

Black and Latino students have only somewhat lower rates of post-secondary school enrollment than whites and Asians, but have much lower levels of educational attainment by their mid-20s, according to the Metropolitan Policy Program’s Martha Ross. While students across these groups enroll at similar rates, they earn bachelor’s degrees at significantly different rates:

Black students are more likely to go to lower quality schools

While there has been an increase in black college-going, most of this rise has been in lower-quality institutions, at least in terms of alumni earnings, illustrates Jonathan Rothwell. Black students make up just four percent of undergraduate enrollees in the top decile of the nation’s four-year colleges, ranked by mid-career alumni earning figures. By contrast, 26 percent of students in the bottom rank of colleges are black:

So how can we solve these problems?

  • SEE embraces the diversity of education, and we do not use it as a crutch or a political tool
  • Your child is special. And if your school hasn’t found your child’s unique qualities, then you need to find a different school.
  • Everybody has a passion. And the role of education is to find that passion and nurture it.
  • Imagine an education system that graduated people who found their life passion and pursued it vigorously.
  • Remember when you learned something new? How good that discovery felt! SEE helps you feel that again!

By partnering together and gathering concerned parents, teachers, students, and citizens alike we increase our numbers. We increase our voice. Everyone benefits from SEE’s mission – OUR mission succeeding. Our children are depending on us.

Pin It on Pinterest